Recovery Weekend declared by county

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JONATHAN DELOZIER
REPORTER

A Recovery Weekend has been declared for this Saturday and Sunday by Lorain County commissioners.

The proclamation was read Oct. 24 by commissioner Lori Kokoski, which also announced a rally for 1 p.m. this Saturday at Amherst’s Golden Acres Nursing Home property in support of a proposed drug addiction recovery center at the site, dubbed Recovery One.

Issue 14 asks for voters’ approval of a o.30-mill levy that would help fund renovation and operation costs for Recovery One. It would raise $2 million and cost property owners $10.50 for every $100,000 of valuation annually.

In Lorain County, 75 percent of children placed in foster care is due to parental substance abuse. One out of six veterans struggle with addiction,” Kokoski said. “The drug and overdose epidemic is an approximate $200 million financial burden on Lorain County. At least $139 million is a negative impact of lost earnings and productivity including absenteeism and employer health care costs for individuals struggling with opioid or other substance abuse disorders.”

Elaine Georgas, executive director of the Alcohol and Drug Addiction Services Board of Lorain County, thanked the commissioners and said area churches are being urged to focus prayer this weekend on addiction recovery.

A recent study indicates that 83 percent of individuals in recovery reported having a compensated, stable job as a result of long-term recovery,” she said. “Involvement in domestic violence decreases dramatically. Frequent use of emergency rooms, other than for chronic conditions, also declines. Reports of no involvement in the legal system for those in recovery is significant.”

Despite this year’s rate of fatal overdoses in the county falling below 2017’s pace that led to 132, commissioner Matt Lundy said the number of total overdoes recorded remains grim.

He said 587 fatal and non-fatal overdoses in the county have occurred in 2018.

We get caught up with the numbers of who’s died as a result of an overdose,” he said. “Through nine months, 587 is still a very troubling number. It’s a very serious problem and an epidemic. It’s a disease, not a choice, and needs to be treated as such.”

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